Journal of Advanced Veterinary Research https://www.advetresearch.com/index.php/AVR <p class="rvps3" style="text-align: justify; text-justify: kashida; text-kashida: 0%; background: white; margin: 12.0pt 0in 12.0pt 0in;"><strong><span style="font-family: 'Georgia','serif'; color: #505050;">Focus and Scope&nbsp;</span></strong></p> <p class="rvps3" style="text-align: justify; text-justify: kashida; text-kashida: 0%; background: white; margin: 12.0pt 0in 12.0pt 0in;"><span style="font-family: 'Georgia','serif'; color: #505050;"><strong>Journal of Advanced Veterinary Research</strong>&nbsp;is an international journal that publishes researches in all matters relevant to the veterinary profession. The mission of the Journal is to provide students, veterinarians and researchers with the current advanced researches in different veterinary disciplines. The key objective of the Journal is to promote the art and science of veterinary medicine and the betterment of animal health and production.</span></p> <p class="rvps3" style="text-align: justify; text-justify: kashida; text-kashida: 0%; background: white; margin: 12.0pt 0in 12.0pt 0in;"><span style="font-family: 'Georgia','serif'; color: #505050;">Articles will be peer-reviewed, published online as a full text, and under the Open Access publishing model.</span></p> <p class="rvps3" style="text-align: justify; text-justify: kashida; text-kashida: 0%; background: white; margin: 12.0pt 0in 12.0pt 0in;"><span style="font-family: 'Georgia','serif'; color: #505050;">ISSN (Print): 2090-6269</span></p> <p class="rvps3" style="text-align: justify; text-justify: kashida; text-kashida: 0%; background: white; margin: 12.0pt 0in 12.0pt 0in;"><span style="font-family: 'Georgia','serif'; color: #505050;">ISSN (Online): 2090-6277</span>&nbsp;</p> Journal of Advanced Veterinary Research en-US Journal of Advanced Veterinary Research 2090-6269 <p>Users have the right to read, download, copy, distribute, print, search, or link to the full texts of articles under the following conditions: Creative Commons&nbsp;Attribution-NonCommercial-NoDerivatives 4.0 International&nbsp;(CC BY-NC-ND 4.0).</p> <p dir="LTR">For more information:&nbsp;<a href="https://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-nc-nd/4.0/" target="_blank"><img src="https://licensebuttons.net/l/by-nc-nd/3.0/88x31.png" alt="" width="88" height="31"></a></p> <div class="six columns omega"> <p><strong>Attribution-NonCommercial-NoDerivs&nbsp;<br>CC BY-NC-ND</strong></p> <p><strong>This work is licensed under a&nbsp;<a href="https://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-nc-nd/4.0/" target="_blank">Creative Commons&nbsp;Attribution-NonCommercial-NoDerivatives&nbsp;4.0 International&nbsp;(CC BY-NC-ND&nbsp;4.0) license</a></strong></p> </div> Effect of Herbal Supplementation to Pelleted Total Mixed Ration on Kinetics of Nutrient Utilization, Blood Biomarkers and Mutton Quality in Sheep https://www.advetresearch.com/index.php/AVR/article/view/785 <p>The present experiment was conducted to observe the effect of plantain (<em>Plantago lanceolata</em> L.) supplementation along with TMR pellet diet on nutrient utilization, blood biomarker and mutton quality in sheep. Sixteen indigenous sheep (<em>Ovis aries</em>) of around one year of age having live weight (LW) 9±0.7 kg were divided into two groups and randomly selected eight sheep were in each. In both groups roadside grass, wheat bran, molasses based total mixed ration (TMR) pellet (ME=2240 kcal/kg dry matter, CP=14.21%) were supplied. But in one group 5% plantain was supplied along with TMR pellet which was termed as PS (Plantain supplemented) diet groups and the other was consider as C (control) diet group. &nbsp;Feeding trial was conducted for 90 days where adjustment period was 75 days and collection period 15 days. At 89<sup>th</sup> day blood samples were collected and meat sample was collected after 90 days. The LW and total digestible nutrients were higher (<em>P</em> &lt; 0.05) and feed conversion ratio was lower (<em>P</em> &lt; 0.05) in PS diet. Significant effect was not found on plasma metabolites except plasma glucose and triglycerides concentration and exhibited lower value for PS diet group. Plantain had effect on caul fat and pelvic fat which were lower (<em>P</em> &lt; 0.05) in PS diet group. Dressing percentage and eye muscle area were higher (<em>P</em> &lt; 0.05) in PS group. It could be concluded that supplementation of plantain herb might be used as additive in sheep diet for better growth performance, lean and functional mutton production.</p> Abdullah Al Sufian Md. Rahat Ahmad Redoy Dr. M. A. Akbar Mohammad Al- Mamun Copyright (c) 11 3 Prominent Reaction to Tissue Factor Antibody in Hemal Node of Egyptian Water Buffalo (Bubalus bubalis) https://www.advetresearch.com/index.php/AVR/article/view/784 <p>Tissue Factor (TF) histology is an essential prognosticator of hemostasis and outcomes in local thrombus. Fresh tissue testing for pathologist evaluation is the best loyal technique for histology categorization, in spite of this, no literature in histology allude to the characteristics and the distribution of TF in hemal node of water buffalo species. In this research paper, author proposes an original approach to predicting cellular allocation to TF antibody in hemal node. Over the branches of iliac arteries of the abdominal aorta and superficial temporal arteries of temporal region, samples were validated on a dataset comprising 7-12 fresh hemal nodes per healthy water buffalo receiving Islamic slaughtering. Samples were fixed in 10% neutral buffered formalin, sections were organized and stained for routine histological interpretations, and anti-TF antibody was utilized for immunofluorescence examination. Hemal node held a small peanut size. It was bordered with a connective tissue capsule fashioned up chiefly of collagen fibers along with few reticular fibers, and smooth muscle cells. Short trabeculae existed from capsule splitting the areas of subcapsular sinus. Inside hemal node parenchyma, lymphoid follicles and blood sinusoids were spontaneously scattered. Immunofluorescence staining highlighted the positive TF expressions to a population of cells homing the capsule, trabeculae, and lymphoid cords. Whereas a few positive TF expression remained demarking the bounds of lymphoid follicles. Hopefully, this research has the potential to enhance new approaches and provide a helpful reference for diagnosticians to monitor any morphological alterations in TF locality and elucidate the pathophysiology of life threating diseases in ruminant.</p> Eman Rashad Copyright (c) 11 3 Total bacterial count and identification of Staphylococcus species from critical control points of raw and processed milk in selected dairy farm in Bishoftu town, Ethiopia https://www.advetresearch.com/index.php/AVR/article/view/782 <p>Milk is synthesized in specialized cells of the mammary gland and is virtually sterile when secreted into the alveoli of the udder. Due to its high nutritive value, milk is prone to microbial contamination and spoilage. Inappropriate milk handling practices might lead to raw milk contamination and spoilage, especially in the farm environment where there is high bacterial burden. A cross-sectional study was carried out from November 2016 to May 2017 in Bishoftu town, Ethiopia to study total bacterial count (TBC) and detection of <em>Staphylococcus aureus</em> from critical control points (CCPs) at dairy farm (water, milker’s hands, milking bucket, udder milk, milk storage, pooled milk, pasteurized milk and yoghurt). A total of 60 samples were subjected for plate count agar (to estimate the colony forming units (cfu) per ml) and bacteriological culture and biochemical tests for the detection of <em>S. aureus</em> and other gram-positive cocci. Descriptive statistics and analytic statistics such as one way ANOVA test was used to calculate the mean difference in cfu/ml among sample sources. The log10 cfu/ml of mean value of bacterial load were 6.10, 5.78, 5.35, 5.15, 4.75, 4.52, 4.42, and 4.32 for pooled milk, water, milker’s hands, udder milk, milk storage, yoghurt, milking bucket, and pasteurized milk, respectively. Comparison of TBC from different sampling points indicated that pooled milk samples had significantly higher (p&lt;0.05) bacterial load than other sampling points. Generally, raw milk had significantly higher (p&lt;0.05) bacterial load (5.63x10<sup>5</sup> cfu/ml) as compared to the processed milk and contact materials. Out of the total 60 bacterial growth, <em>Staphylococcus</em> species accounts 73.3% (44/60) of the total growth, with coagulase negative staphylococci (CNS) and <em>Staphylococcus aureus</em> accounting for 36 (60.0%), and 8 (13.33%) of the isolates, respectively. <em>S. aureus</em> was isolated mainly from milker’s hand, udder milk, and pooled milk samples. We found that the total bacterial count from contact surfaces, raw milk and dairy products was below the recommended standard and the presence of <em>Staphylococcus</em> isolates at different CCPs indicates poor milk production practices. The high level of contamination and presence of potentially pathogenic bacteria could pose public health risk due to infection and intoxications. Hence, the dairy farm should design a strategy to improve the hygienic practice on milk production, handling, and processing.</p> Ararsa Kumala Fethu Lemma Bruk Abraha Fitwi Copyright (c) 11 3 Impact of changes in some hematological and biochemical parameters in ewes during late pregnancy on Parturition and Lamb’s Viability https://www.advetresearch.com/index.php/AVR/article/view/775 <p class="MsoNormal" style="text-align: justify; line-height: 200%;"><span lang="EN-US" style="font-size: 12pt; line-height: 200%; font-family: 'Times New Roman', serif; color: #111111; background-image: initial; background-attachment: initial; background-size: initial; background-origin: initial; background-clip: initial; background-position: initial; background-repeat: initial;">Several nutritional problems can be observed in ewes with advance pregnancy when energy demands related to fetal development increase, </span><span lang="EN-US" style="font-size: 12pt; line-height: 200%; font-family: 'Times New Roman', serif; background-image: initial; background-attachment: initial; background-size: initial; background-origin: initial; background-clip: initial; background-position: initial; background-repeat: initial;">then <span style="color: #111111;">can have a negative impact for ewes and their lambs during this period. The aim of our study was the assessment of hematological and biochemical parameters changes in ewes during late pregnancy and </span></span><span lang="EN-US" style="font-size: 12.0pt; line-height: 200%; font-family: 'Times New Roman','serif';">the influence of some factors on the later, as well his impact on parturition and lamb&rsquo;s viability.<span style="color: #111111; background-image: initial; background-attachment: initial; background-size: initial; background-origin: initial; background-clip: initial; background-position: initial; background-repeat: initial;">&nbsp; In this study blood samples were collected from forty ewes of <em>Rembi</em> breed during the end of pregnancy, housed in four different farms in the region of Tiaret, aged 2 to 6 year old. The</span> choice of these ewes was made randomly. Our results recorded a decrease in the values of red blood cells (RBC), hemoglobin (Hb), hematocrite (Ht), Iron (Fe), and glucose (Glu), plus an increase in total white blood cells (WBC) compared to the range of reference.&nbsp; Statistical analyzes showed a significant influence of age on the RBC and Fe values with a highly significant influence of parity on the mean corpuscular volume (MCV) value. Our results recorded a positive correlation between (RBC, Hb and Ht) and Glu value, whereas a negative correlation was found between WBC and platelets (PLA). Metabolic diseases which due to nutritional problems are very important in ewes at the end of pregnancy, <span class="jlqj4b">and then it is necessary</span> to highlight the <span class="jlqj4b">changes that can adversely affect lambing and lamb viability </span>in this physiological stage.</span></p> Souad Aiche Copyright (c) 11 3 Effect of mahogany bark extract on growth, feed utilization and proximate composition in catfish (Clarias gariepinus) https://www.advetresearch.com/index.php/AVR/article/view/772 <p>This study assessed the impact of mahogany bark extract in the diets of catfish (<em>Clarias</em> <em>gariepinus</em>) fingerlings. The effects of four diets supplemented with mahogany bark extracts on growth performance, feed utilization and proximate composition was evaluated. Four diets were prepared using mahogany bark extract as a supplement at 0ml (Trt 0), 10ml (Trt 1), 20ml (Trt 2) and 30ml (Trt 3) per 100g of feed. One hundred fingerlings of <em>Clarias</em> <em>gariepinus</em> with initial weight of 1.25g were stocked in four treatments with a replicate each in 60 litre bowls at 20 fingerlings per bowl. The results showed a significant difference amongst the four treatments with respect&nbsp; to final weight, weight gain, daily weight gain, condition factor, feed conversion ratio and specific growth rate (P&lt;0.05). It was observed that the least value for feed intake occurred in fish fed diet Trt 3. Group fed diet supplemented with 20 ml mahogany bark extract (Trt 2) was significantly higher in final weight (26.10±0.88), weight gain (24.77±0.88), daily weight gain (1855±66.20) and specific growth rate (3.26±0.03) and also lower at feed conversion ratio (1.26±0.04). This study therefore recommends 20ml mahogany bark extract (Trt 2) per 100g of feed as appropriate supplement for <em>Clarias</em> <em>gariepinus</em> diets.</p> CHRISTIAN AYISI Abubakari Osman Arimiyaw Grace DEBRA Mensah Gertrude Dzifa Copyright (c) 11 3